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  "We see nothing truly until we understand it"~ John Constable

American Dec. Art
     
 

"Vest Agder Trunk""
©Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum

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"Russian Master Zhostovo Tray "
© Sergey Filipov

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Nothing exists until or unless it is observed. An artist is making something exist by observing it. And his hope for other people is that they will also make it exist by observing it. I call it creative observation. Creative viewing” ~ William S. Burroughs

Historical Decorative Art in America...

Learn about some of the Historical Decorative Artists and their work in America. See where and how it all started and how it continued to evolve over time. The styles are interesting and colorful and have become some of the most 'collectable' of Folk Art pieces. These Master Folk Artists left a very distinct footprint on the world of American Folk Art.

Earlier concepts that were brought to America by immigrants were influenced by many different cultures. Born from new ideas and experiences these art forms were unique to the artists and at times to the region they were created in. Each style different but at the same time charming and quite distinct.. Join us as we explore some of the earlier American folk art forms...

Where did it all start?

What do the towns of Jonestown, Harrisburg, Lancaster, Gettysburg, Millersburg, Reading and Kutztown, Pennsylvania have in common? These small towns in Eastern USA share a natural artistic history with many others. They are not alone as there are towns from Maine such as Bangor, Norway, Franklin and Concord that share the same artistic history. All over the Eastern United states we will read about the early artists and the incredible Folk Art from these states. These artists also came to and from New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

 
 
     
 
Peter Ompir, Floral tray, mixed media on metal, Private Collection.
 
 
Image© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, GA, USA
 
 
Peter Ompir was one of the Fathers of American Decorative Painting.
 

 

Mass Immigration to America...

During the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, immigrants flocked to the United States by the thousands. Among these immigrants were artistic individuals who were among the middle classes. They settled into the rural communities and their life as traveling artists began. They painted on tin, fabric, wood, and furniture, they did sign painting and fractur painting. They were called on to paint the architectural details of country homes and decorated the coaches that 'folks' traveled in. They painted walls, floors, floor cloths and murals. Over the years, we can imagine that they created a huge body of work that is today prized and highly collectable. Many pieces of these early artworks are housed in private collections or in museums around the United States and other parts of the world.

These artists were not highly trained in the traditional sense of the academic artist from the European established standards. But these artists had skills that they learned through years of practice and they had an instinctive eye for design and color. Many of them had to satisfy the needs of the client and so worked to please. These artists also became the early American portrait painters, as they had attained a high degree of skill and painting experience.

Tole Painting Example ~ Painting on Tin Ware ~ Artist Susan Abdella, MDA

During the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries The New England and Pennsylvania region was thought by many to be the 'craft center' of America. It is believed that Decorative Painting evolved from these regions. Each area developed its own style with little nuances that made each area unique to itself. Many of the traditional Folk Art styles that the immigrants brought with them from Old Europe were modified or changed and they too evolved to form their own unique style in the United states.

These artists paints were not refined or of the highest quality as they relied on raw pigments that were readily available to them. Many of them made their own pigments and most of the time their palettes were limited to the available colors. Popular colors were made from available 'clays' found locally. They turned to the natural yellow, green-earth and gray green and gray clays. It is thought that they even used 'brick-dust' to make certain red pigments. Skunk Cabbage was used to make greens and other natural dyes were used such as dogwood berries. They relied on boiled nuts to provide a variety of brown hues and they soon learned that Walnuts could give them a mahogany color while Chestnuts could provide a tan color. The indigo plant imported from India provided a blue color but was difficult to come by. As you can imagine it must have been quite expensive so it was used sparingly.

These artists were very creative. They were the roots of decorative Painting as we know them today. They traveled from town to town, just as they did in the 'old' country and they took their skills with them when they looked for work. They painted chests, stenciled the walls of rural homes, painted signs for coaches and local businesses, painted wallpaper, fire boards, floor cloths and everyday tin objects.

The later years... 1900's

As time moved forward and into the 1900's, three unique artists made a lasting impact on the Decorative Arts in America. These three men were Peter Hunt, Per Lynse and Peter Ompir. (Read more about these men on this page of the web site) Through their business savvy and marketing intuitions they were able to create a demand for their artwork. It states in the book,' Fathers of America Decorative Painting', published by the Decorative Arts Collection Museum; Per Lynse has been given the credit for reviving interest in Norwegian Rosemaling.

Peter Hunt was a smart businessman, he impressed the the social circles of Boston, New York and Cape Cod with his charm and natural 'gift of the gab'. These social connections soon allowed him access to marketing his artwork through large department stores such as Macy's and Gimbels. Eventually the artwork's success and popularity allowed him to develop a small retail village of his own, a tourist attraction in Provincetown. He called it Peter Hunt's Peasant Village. The rest is now history.

Peter Hunt artwork - 1896 - 1967
The artwork of Peter Hunt was most popular during the late1930's and 1940's. This artist was able to gain recognition for his work through 'connection's he made within certain social circles. Through large advertising campaigns, Peter Hunt was able to convince housewives to make old things new again. He developed a painting technique he dubbed, 'Transformagic'. He published a workbook and a how to do it book, and soon his name and style became everyday, household words.
Peter Hunt artwork Images© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, GA, USA
Today the artwork of Peter hunt is highly collectible. Decorative artists and folk art collectors are always on the hunt for these special finds.

 

Per Lynse was born in Norway in 1880. He comes from a family of artists as his father was a well known and celebrated Norwegian Rosemaler. Lynse learned and trained with his father. In 1907 Lynse and his young wife immigrated to America and he began work at Mandt Wagon Works in Stougton, WI. His ability to paint was further developed and he was able to earn a living when the Great Depression caused the Wagon factory to close. His artwork became popular after he designed a large Smorgasbord plate (Swedish word), forcing the artist to paint in an assembly line fashion to keep up with the demand for these orders.

Per Lynse artwork ~ 1880-1947
 

The artwork of Per Lynse often incorporates red, blue, yellow, green and pink on light colored backgrounds. When asked about his work, Per Lynse replied, " One sees designs in flowers, wallpapers and lace and takes part of these and adapts them to his own use, developing them according to his own style. There is, perhaps no such thing as original design."

*Image used with permission from ~ ‘Vesterheim American Norwegian Museum’

 

Peter Ompir who chose to refer to himself at times as Peter the Great was a great business man. Originally trained in fine art, at the Art Institute of Chicago and as well at the national and America Art Academies. Ompir's career in fine art was not able to flourish as he started during the years of the Great Depression. He understood the market and realized that a depressed market could not indulge in Fine Art. He turned to painting on common items that folks could afford. There is real truth in the expression, ' Necessity is the mother of invention!" Cigarette boxes, trays, pitchers and anything old that he could acquire. He often traveled around looking for unusual and functional surfaces to paint on. He eventually settled in Sheffield, MA. Ompir painted for more than forty years, producing a huge body of work that was sold under the umbrella of Peter Ompir. He worked with other artists such as Warner Wrede who went on to become an accomplished artist himself after Ompir's death in may of 1979..

Peter Ompir - Peter the Great, 'artwork serves function'

It is clear to see the functionality in the choice of surfaces that Peter Ompir worked on. The marketing aspects of this artist's work apply even to today, where consumers may weigh the value of an item based on functionality rather than artistic merit alone.

A beer tray and a cigarette box are common place items, yet there decorative embellishments make them artwork rather than serve only for pure function.

 

Peter Ompir artwork Images© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, GA, USA
Peter Ompir's artwork, enamel on metal (above) and enamel on wood (lower) both of these examples are in private collections, are examples of the styles and the surfaces of function that this artist selected. Note the beautiful patina that these pieces show, the natural aged colors are still vibrant.

 

Peter Hunt - Peter Ompir - Per Lynse - The Fathers of Americam Decorative Painting
 

If you are interested in reading more on these three men and their work, the Decorative Arts Collection Museum has created an interesting 33 page catalog/booklet; 'The Fathers of American Decorative Painting' This can be purchased directly from their website shop and is a great resource for students. The following link will take you directly to this exhibition page.

You can go to this link to see more about the book.

 

Reference:Techniques in American Folk Decorations by Jean Lipman

Reference: The Fathers of American Decorative Painting - Decorative Arts Collection, Inc.

Tools of the Trade - The early years...

These artists were itinerant workers, they traveled from town to town searching for work. They would come into a town and the word would spread that a craftsman was available to 'do the decorating'. Their tools were crude and their materials quite raw. Their brushes were made from simple materials, 'cat's hair' was often used as it was quite soft and served the purpose. They used goose and duck feathers for some techniques like creating marble effects on floors and table tops. They would often use a leather comb for creating wood graining and a simple sponge for mottling techniques.

What surfaces did they paint on?

The earliest Decorative Paintings were as varied as the artists themselves. The homesteads in the rural communities were prized by their owners and those who live in them. Many of these immigrants were starting fresh, with a new life and they were collecting new possessions. Their homes were painted in bright colors, Venetian Red, Yellow Ochre, Russet, Gray, and Blues and Greens. History tells us that they often painted their roofs with Vermilion hues and may have painted the windows, doors and other trim areas of the house with greens or blues. Research has also shown that the floors of these simple dwellings were painted with colors such as yellows, reds and greens. The itinerant artists were called upon to add stenciling to the decorations and to dress up the floors with either marbleizing or with the addition of stenciling patterns.

Peter Ompir - mixed media on metal. Private Collection. Image© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Fruit motifs were very popular as seen here on this painted tin tray from a later period, the strawberry motif is quite often seen.

Found within these homes were many surfaces for the artists to add their touches to. The fireplace was usually covered during the summer months to keep out drafts, and the covering, known as the fire board was a perfect surface for the artist. These fire boards were usually decorated with simple Still Life designs, or even a Landscape design depicting the general area. Fruit and Flower motifs were also used.

Fireplace mantles or panels that were hung over the mantle provided another larger surface for art of this type and style. Through out the home, there were splashes of bright and happy color. The window shades, the furniture and the fabric coverings that hung over the windows, or used as bed linens were all embellished in some way or another.

The style of furniture was also varied. The homes of the farmers and townspeople were decorated just as the homes of the larger landholders did. Those who had their more elegant homes were just able to afford more of it. Furniture that came from these larger farms found around the Connecticut River, was decidedly of a grander scale. These furniture pieces were decorated with designs heavily influenced by the Old Dutch Masters. The designs show the influence of the Flemish and the French artists of old. The designs were more elegant and it has been said some looked very similar to English crewelwork patterns.

Some of the furniture pieces were simple and utilitarian as blanket chests, we see these today as a traditional chest of drawers. The 'Dutch' cupboards, made and decorated in the early 1700's would have sold for about one English Pound. These Dutch cupboards were found in the Dutch communities of New York and New Jersey. The 'dower' chests which were given to the young woman of marrying age or when she became engaged, would have had her initials and a design painted on it. Some of the decorations may have included hearts, the tree of life or even the wedding couple pictured in simple rendition.

Trunks and chests of every style and description were popular, with each artist from different communities putting their unique twist into the style of painted decoration. In Pennsylvania, the Lancaster county chests differ in style as well as colors and they were often painted on a lighter background color and with design motifs of birds, hearts, and tulips. In Montgomery county the trunks that came from there were often decorated with geometric designs. Each county offered its unique style of motif and color. Some had backgrounds that were two toned while others decorated with brightly colored flowers.

Reference:

Techniques in American Folk Decorations by Jean Lipman

The Fathers of American Decorative Painting - Decorative Arts Collection, Inc.

Brush Control for stroke work...

The Early American painters had excellent brush control. Like many of our contemporary Folk Art designers today, they learned from others and they spent many years apprenticing under the guidance of other artists.

The designs demanded good control of the brush to create the liner work and the fine details. The designs were painted 'free-hand'. This in itself tells us that they had to know what they were doing.

Popular Techniques that were often used by the Early American Artists were...

  • Wood Graining - Patterns were created on a wet layer. Any object that could create a pattern was used as a tool for this technique. Leather combs were popular tools of the trade.
  • Gold Leafing - In some cases, the gold leaf was applied as a base and fine details were painted over the leaf, such as the veins of a leaf.
  • Marbling - This was often created with smoke. After a coat of white paint was applied and then varnished, a lighted candle was passed close to the surface so the smoke could adhere to the almost dry surface. The smoke formed intricate and interesting patterns of the surface and made for a popular background treatment.
  • Vinegar Painting and 'putty graining' - This was a technique used in the middle of the seventeenth century to create interesting 'faux' finishes on furniture. The base colors were applied to the surface and let dry. Another color was applied as a second coat, this layer was mixed with vinegar and a roll of putty was rolled into a cylinder shape, the end of the roll was used to stamp the paint to remove the wet paint leaving a distinct pattern behind. Popular colors used for this were pale yellow as a base color, made with ochre and white. The second layer was a mix of Burnt Umber and vinegar.
  • Tortoise Shell - This was an elegant and interesting 'faux' finish. The colors were strong and rich. It was common to use red under layers of browns and blacks. A layering technique was used, and a brush was used to remove the color while the final layers were still wet.
  • Mottling - Patterns were created by thinning the paint with linseed oil to achieve a transparent appearance.
  • Stippling - Patterns were created by thinning the paint with linseed oil to achieve a transparent appearance.
  • Finger painting - Fingers made novel tools, the back of a knuckle, the heel of the hand and the ball of the finger were all used in negative treatments where the wet paint was removed to reveal a base color. The hand could be moved in a swirling pattern and create interesting effects.
  • Sponging - Patterns were created by thinning the paint with linseed oil to achieve a transparent appearance. The transparent paint was applied with a sponge.
  • Painting with feathers - Feathers served as valuable tools to make patterns in wet paint. The base coat was applied and left to dry. Transparent colored glazes were applied over the dried under painting and a feather was dragged through the wet paint to create the effects that the artist needed.
  • Bronze painting - Reserved for the painters who were at the top of their craft. A charcoal stump was dipped into the golden powder and applied as highlights to the design. This was worked into a surface that was almost dry. Expertise was required and a controlled hand.
  • Japanning - In America, the craftsmen and artists were imitating their English counterparts. These artists were influenced by the lacquer work made popular in the Orient. The Chippendale and Hepplewhite furniture from the seventeenth century was designed to be Japanned. The custom transferred to America and examples of the same were created by the American artists. There were craftsmen who trained in this style of decoration and examples can be found such as mirrors and clocks and larger furniture pieces like highboys and lowboys for bedroom furnishings.

On brush work ...

American Folk Art painter, Peter Hunt firmly believed that if you could paint a comma stroke, you could paint anything. Below is a Worksheet from Peter Hunt’s Workbook illustrating the versatility of the comma stroke - graciously shared by Andy Jones, Director of the Decorative Arts Collection Museum in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

 
 
   
   
Image© used with permission from the Decorative Arts Collection Museum, (DAC) Atlanta, Georgia, USA

The Art Apprentice Online asked Andy Jones, Director of the Decorative Arts Collection of Atlanta, Georgia, to share with us some history of these two famous icons of the American Folk Art Community. The following information is what was kindly provided to us.

A Little History Lesson - part one
Peter Hunt
Some information about the painters and their work
by Andy Jones

The art work of “Peter Lord Templeton Hunt”

Peter Hunt ~ Enamel on Wood

Image used with permission from the Decorative Arts Collection Museum, (DAC) Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Peter Hunt - The Artist - (1867-1967)

This “history lesson” is about two of my favorite artists. They happened to be incredibly talented and influential. I never met either of them and, the funny thing is that neither of these two guys was really named Peter!

I guess I should really thank Priscilla Hauser as one of my first teachers and mentors, she introduced me to these artists and instilled in me an admiration for their talent and their paintings.

When I was a teenager I went to one of Priscilla’s seminars called Penn-Dutch. This was somewhat of a misnomer, but it was a fun week nonetheless. We learned about the Pennsylvania Germans and their artwork and the basic stroke work they used to create much of it. One of the more fascinating lessons of the week was painting, a “Peter Hunt” style angel. She had the original at the seminar for all of us to see.

Peter Hunt ~ decorating a panel.

Image used with permission from the Decorative Arts Collection Museum, (DAC) Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Peter Hunt - The art work

Now, let me talk a little about his artwork. Hunt painted on all kinds of cast off items from large pieces of furniture to small accessory pieces. Many (the majority) of his pieces have a white background.

He often antiqued his pieces with what was called “turkey umber.” There are stories of people scrubbing and scrubbing to try to get the “dirt” off of a piece!
He painted his designs using DuPont enamel house paint! Generally speaking, the pieces were quite bright and “colorful.” Some would categorize them as garish… He firmly believed if you could paint a comma stroke, you could paint anything.

Peter Hunt - enamel on metal - Private Collection

Image© used with permission from the Decorative Arts Collection Museum, (DAC) Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Hunt was incredibly prolific. However he could not keep up with the demand for painted pieces. He hired apprentices to help meet the demand. When Hunt painted a piece, he signed it with his “faux French abbreviation” for Provincetown... Ovince and the date “anno domino”
If a piece was painted by an apprentice, it was signed Peter Hunt.

Priscilla had purchased 27 Peter Hunt originals at an auction years before… She was fascinated by him, his work, his philosophy and the stories that surrounded him. As she talked about this man, I
thought, “How neat, a man made a living with decorative painting…” This was my first glimpse into his world. I remember seeing that original angel and thinking how old and worn it looked…. Years later I can
appreciate it for its charm and folk art appeal. She is also responsible for introducing me to Peter Ompir, in a “round about” way. She brought the paintings of Robert Berger to the decorative painting audience. She wrote an instruction book with him that featured her lessons and his paintings. They were done in acrylics at a time when acrylic paints were not readily available (except for artist tube acrylics.) It was through Robert Berger that I learned of Ompir… the two had worked together in the past.

A little more about Peter Hunt…
Peter Hunt was born Fredrick Schnitzer in Jersey City, NJ in 1869. Neither his name nor the lowly circumstances of his birth
would suit him…He was very artistic as a youth and often called himself, “Peter
Lord Templeton Hunt.” As you can guess the grandiose name matched his ego!

If you have a chance to look at a piece painted by Hunt or a piece painted by Nancy Whorf, you can quickly
tell the difference. Whorf generally added layers of over strokes where Hunt did not. Also, Whorf’s strokes
were generally neater and much better formed than Hunt’s.
I wanted to share a few images of Hunt’s work with you so you get an idea of the charm these pieces have.

Peter Hunt dies in 1967

Peter Hunt died on his beloved Cape Cod in 1967. His work once again commands top dollar at antique shops,
with folk art dealers and at auction.

Peter Hunt- enamel on metal - Private collection.

Image© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

He settled into an artistic lifestyle in Greenwich Village in New York City. He designed sets for the theater and did batik fabrics. At the onset of World War I he joined the ambulance corps and headed to Europe. It was at this time that he first encountered the “peasant style” art of the Alsace region of France and Poland and Germany. When he returned to the United States, he continued to live in New York City where he met Helena Rubenstein (who was to remain
a life-long friend of his.) She introduced him to summers on Cape Cod and her favorite sea side resort, Provincetown.
He was fascinated by this charming village and bought a house on Commerce Street. It was here that he first began to decorate cast-off furniture with the peasant style decorations.

Peter Hunt’s shop decorated for the Christmas Season

Peter Hunt charms the social circles...The wealthy tourists who “summered” on the cape found his decorated items irresistible! The bought all he had and clamored for more. He took full advantage of the demand and set out to charm the social elite who purchased items from him. It was through his well cultivated social connections that he was able to sell his painted goods at Macy’s and Gimbel’s department stores in New York.

Peter Hunt - enamel on wood. Image© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

He used his income from these sales to purchase other homes across the street from his house and create a retail area he called Peter Hunt’s Peasant Village.
Now, the demand for his work was beyond his capacity to produce it. He hired local teenagers to help him create the pieces. Among the two most notable apprentices were Carol and Nancy Whorf, daughters of
noted watercolorist John Whorf.

 

 

Things were going well until the outbreak of World War II. The demand for his work waned. Hunt took advantage of the war effort to encourage others to decorate
their cast-off items. He teamed with the DuPont paint company to produce pamphlets on how to do this….He called this “Transformagic” It was a hit.

He soon published two hard cover books and took the How-To-Do-It show on the road. He did a nation wide publicity tour demonstrating how easy it was to use the enamel house paints and a round brush to paint these wonderful designs on virtually ANYTHING.

 


  • If you are interested in learning more about the Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Please visit their web site.
  • Decorative Arts Collection Museum, 650 Hamilton Ave, SE, Suite M, Atlanta, Georgia, 30312, USA.
  • Andy Jones - Director, ph - 404-627-3662
  • N.B. All images and all information in this article are copyrighted © and may not be used in any way whatsoever without the express permission of Andy Jones and or the Decorative Arts Collection
  • Decorative Arts Collection Museum

The Art Apprentice Online asked Andy Jones, Director of the Decorative Arts Collection of Atlanta, Georgia, to share with us some history of these two famous icons of the American Folk Art Community. The following information is what was kindly provided to us.

A Little History Lesson - part two
Peter Ompir
Some information about the painters and their work
by Andy Jones

The art work of “Peter Ompir ”
Peter Ompir - closeup image of tray below
Peter Ompir, floral tray - private collection. Images used with permission from Andy Jones, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, GA. USA

Peter Ompir - (1904 - 1979)

Charles Burns was born in Pittsburg, PA in 1904. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and at the National and American Art Academies.
His formal art training prepared him for a life as a portrait artist. Unfortunately, his career was beginning at the onset of the Great Depression. He turned to painting cast off items… his most popular
motifs were fruits, roosters, and men in colonial garb. These are the motifs we most closely associated with
him, but he was so talented that no subject matter escaped his brush. The variety in his subjects is staggering. He sold his work through an agent for a while, then through retail outlets.

 

There are two large beer trays (shown below left). One has an aqua background and the other a nice, bright red color.

Notice that the design is basically the same. there is some variation in the leaves, but the three apples are
there on both trays.

Each tray has the three different color apples in the same location. This illustrates
how they mass produced the designs. The interesting thing is that each tray is slightly different.

In 1979, Peter Ompir died of cancer.

He was a prolific artist. His partner Werner Wrede also worked with him throughout his career. Additionally, other artist also painted for him; Porter Reinhardt, Robert Berger and Bruce Copeland among them. All work done for the business was signed Peter Ompir. All of these men went on to sell work under their own names.  
 

Peter Ompir - mixed media on metal. Private Collection.

Image© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Peter Ompir - mixed media on metal. Private Collection.

Image© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 

The care and time that went into the pieces is evident when you see a piece. They are completely decorated
and finished.
People often ask if he painted in acrylics. The answer is no. His career began before acrylics were invented. He most likely worked in artist grade tempera. This would have had the quick drying capabilities that were necessary. His antiquing process was done with oil products and the pieces were varnished with oil based varnish.

 

Peter Ompir - Man with Strawberry & close up featured below, mixed media on metal. Private Collection.

Images© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 
Peter Ompir - Charles Burns   Peter Ompir - Rooster, on wood

Often people think this work is rare. This could not be further from the truth. Ompir painted for the wholesale market for 40 years. At the height of his productivity, there were several artists producing work. They could mass produce as many as 35 beer trays in a day. (The base coating, antiquing and varnishing would take additional time.)

So there is a vast quantity of work out there. Finding it may be a different story! I wanted to share some images of his work so you can see the variety in subject matter and the surfaces he
painted on.

 

 

 

Peter Ompir - Apples , mixed media on ceramic. Private Collection.

All Images© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 

 

 

 

Peter Ompir - mixed media on metal. Images© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Peter Ompir painted directly on the glass that was in the frame.

Peter Ompir - mixed media on glass. Images© used with permission, Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 
  • If you are interested in learning more about the Decorative Arts Collection Museum, Please visit their web site.
  • Decorative Arts Collection Museum, 650 Hamilton Ave, SE, Suite M, Atlanta, Georgia, 30312, USA.
  • Andy Jones - Director, ph - 404-627-3662
  • N.B. All images and all information in this article are copyrighted © and may not be used in any way whatsoever without the express permission of Andy Jones and or the Decorative Arts Collection Museum.
  • Decorative Arts Collection Museum

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